The Wallflower Photography Blog


In October 2014, while participating in a workshop led by famous wedding photographer Jerry Ghionis, we encountered a new type of wedding album made in Italy that was jaw-droppingly gorgeous and like nothing we had ever seen before. We simply had to start offering the new Digital Matted Albums by GraphiStudio to our clientele.

Back before digital imaging technology completely changed wedding photography ten or so years ago, most of the best wedding albums consisted of individual photographic prints that were set into mats — thick paperboard in black, white, cream, maybe even a color, with openings cut for the prints to show through. You might be familiar with mats that often come with frames. For albums, those matted prints became the pages.

In their new Digital Matted Albums, GraphiStudio has recreated the look of an old-school matted photo album, but modernized with truly state-of-the-art digital printing and lovely papers. It’s much easier to appreciate the beauty and uniqueness of these albums in person, and this post is my best attempt at showing and explaining the somewhat arcane details of the GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album (and Image Boxes, too!).

First, start by taking a look at these photos of one of the sample albums that we have here in our studio for our clients (and prospective clients) to drool over. It is 9×13.5 inches with 30 photos (30 pages). The cover is real metal in the ‘Matte Silver’ finish, printed with a cool silhouette photo of our bride and groom in front of a sculpture at Chihuly Garden and Glass in Seattle, where their wedding took place. The spine and back of the album are wrapped in genuine leather, and the album is stored in a matching black leather sleeve. We also chose black for the inner lining of the cover, with the Wallflower logo printed as a sort of artist’s signature.

Photo of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album in sleeve owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album with metal cover owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of inner lining of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Look again at the previous photo, focusing on the pages this time. Notice the shades of silver, gold and brown in the page stack. Now let’s open the album to the first page of the ceremony.

Photo of second bride and groom portrait spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

For this particular spread, the left page has a ‘Gold’ mat, and the right page has a ‘Black’ mat. The gold is metallic, so the page shimmers beautifully as it reflects the light. The black is matte.

These papers are two of the six papers that can be used in a GraphiStudio “Multipaper” Digital Matted Album. The paper is actually quite thin. After printing, they are mounted to a thick paperboard core, which makes the pages rigid, and those are bound together with covers to form an album.

Although we call them “digital mats,” they aren’t real mats at all. The photo is printed directly onto the fancy paper that makes up the page surface. Normally, if you print a photo directly onto a colored paper, the color would come right through the photo, usually in unpleasant ways. When the paper is black, you can hardly see the photo, it’s so dark. So, first GraphiStudio must print a block of solid white onto the paper, and then print the photo so that it’s perfectly lined up over the white. The photo then retains the texture of the paper but not its color, appearing as bright and colorful as it’s meant to be.

There’s more. The mat (i.e. the part of the paper around the photo) is then printed with a pattern or ornamentation of some sort. Looking back at the two pages above, the gold mat on the left has a photo with a thick, detailed border of white ivy, and the black mat has a photo surrounded by a thin white border and fancy white corner brackets. On top of the white ivy border is printed a clear matte varnish, which counteracts the metallic sheen of the gold paper. On top of the thin white border and corner brackets is printed a clear glossy varnish, which makes them pop against the matte finish of the mat.

In person, the effect of the varnishes is fascinating, definitely one of the coolest aspects of the Digital Matted Album, but it’s very hard to see in the photos or to visualize in general. To get a sense of how the varnish (and the metallic papers) shimmer in the light, hover your mouse over the detail photo below to see what happens when I change the angle of the light slightly:

Photo of first wedding ceremony spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

The dark brown and black papers on the left have a matte finish, and the varnish patterns are glossy, so they really pop when the light hits them right. Because the silver, light gold, and gold papers on the right are metallic and have their own sheen, I used a matte varnish over the white splatter border on the silver paper and the white ivy border on the gold paper to cancel the metallic sheen. The glossy varnish would have looked cool there, too, and we have control over all that.

Now let’s look at more pages in the album, as we flip through the pages covering the wedding ceremony in the Glasshouse and portraits afterwards in the garden and museum.

Photo of first wedding ceremony spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

‘Silver’ left, ‘Light Gold’ right.

Photo of second wedding ceremony spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

‘Black’ left and right. The cursive script in Italian has a glossy varnish effect, and spans both page mats.

Photo of third wedding ceremony spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

‘Blue’ left, full-bleed photo on right. There’s a glossy varnish border around the outer edge of the right page, right over the photo, with the same pattern as the border around the photo on the left page. It’s nearly invisible at this angle, but shimmers into sight at different angles.

Photo of first wedding party portrait spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

‘Beige’ left and right. The corner brackets have glossy varnish, and the rest of the mat is printed with a crumpled-paper texture that also serves to darken the light-colored paper.

Photo of second wedding party portrait spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

‘Silver’ left and right. A wavy stream of dashes in glossy varnish spans both mats, but at this angle you have to squint to see it.

Photo of first bride and groom portrait spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Full-bleed photo on left, ‘Light Brown’ right. A glossy damask pattern on the brown mat encroaches onto the left and right edges of the full-bleed photo.

Photo of second bride and groom portrait spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

‘Gold’ left, ‘Black’ right. An ivy border in white surrounds the photo on the gold mat. Because the gold paper has a metallic sheen, the white ivy border has a matte varnish to counter the sheen. The ornamental white corner brackets around the photo on right have a glossy varnish against a matte paper, in contrast.

Photo of third bride and groom portrait spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Full-bleed photo on left, ‘Silver’ right. In the upper-left corner of the full-bleed photo you can make out the couples’ names, written in a glossy varnish. The silver paper on the right is “tarnished” with a lightly printed pattern.

Photo of fourth bride and groom portrait spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

‘Black’ left and right. This time, the black paper has been printed with a gray-toned pattern that spans the full spread. The only varnish is in the thin white lines that frame each photo.

Photo of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album in storage sleeve owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

We have a second Digital Matted Album in our studio, this one a 12×12 inch book of Brit and Zak’s wedding at the Chambers Bay Golf Course. It’s wrapped in ‘Light Blue’ genuine leather with a cutout for a small, square ‘Crystal Glance’ photo, and is stored in a matching sleeve. The inner lining is ‘Pearl’ with the Wallflower logo.

Photo of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album in light blue genuine leather with crystal glance owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of detail of crystal glance and embossed names in cover of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of pearl inner lining of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

The pages of this book have a key difference compared to the first album in this post. Whereas the first sample was a ‘Multipaper’ album, this second sample is a ‘White Paper’ album (which the GraphiStudio website calls the DMA option). In this album, each page is a plain, white paper instead of one of the eight Multipaper options.

However, this does not mean that the mat on every page is white! We can have mats of any color, with any pattern and any varnish, it just means that we need to print the color onto it. The difference between White Paper and Multipaper is hard to spot on the darker papers that have a matte finish (black, brown, blue). The difference is more obvious in the metallic papers. Gold color printed onto white paper lacks the lovely metallic sheen of the true gold paper. Silver becomes flat gray. It’s still attractive, but not quite the same.

So why would you want the ‘White Paper’ option instead of ‘Multipaper’? Truly, there’s only one reason, and it’s price. Digital Matted Albums are not cheap, but you can save $10/page by going with the lower-cost paper. And ‘White Paper’ albums still have the same cool glossy and matte varnish effects, and the same cover options. Here we’ll flip through some pages in this large, 50-photo album — you’ll see the entire wedding ceremony plus an assortment of some of my favorite pages from the reception and our sunset photo shoot with Brit and Zak down on the beach.

Photo of first ceremony spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of second ceremony spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of third ceremony spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of fourth ceremony spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of fifth ceremony spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of sixth ceremony spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of first dance spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of toasting ceremony spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of first sunset portrait spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of second sunset portrait spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of girls dancing spread of GraphiStudio Digital Matted Album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

There’s a really great alternative way to get these Digital Matted Albums: minus the album! GraphiStudio also offers Image Boxes, which are beautifully built boxes filled with loose digital matted prints. We have two of them in our studio. The first one to be pictured below features photos from Julia and Greg’s wedding at Thornewood Castle. The Graphi Box is wrapped in two colors of genuine leather, ‘Tobacco’ (the darker brown) and ‘Cappuccino’. The bride and groom’s names and wedding date are embossed onto the cover. The inside material is ‘Touch Paper’ with a nice soft-smooth texture in black. A black ribbon goes under the prints to help you get them out. There are 20 8×10.5 inch Multipaper prints stored in the box, each one mounted to a black substrate (the thick, rigid paperboard under the printed paper).

Photo of GraphiStudio Image Box in leather owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of embossed names on GraphiStudio Image Box in leather owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of open GraphiStudio Image Box with DMA prints inside owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Here are some of the prints stored in this box, one for each of the different Multipaper options. In the left column, we have silver, black and blue. In the center, it’s light gold and beige. On the right, it’s gold, dark brown, and light brown.

Photo of Multipaper DMA prints from inside GraphiStudio Image Box owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Like you saw earlier, each mat color (whether ‘Multipaper’ or ‘White Paper’) can be further altered by printing a pattern, or even a color, onto it. In the photo below, all three prints on the left are on the ‘Silver’ paper. The far left print shows the normal silver mat, and of the two next to it, the upper print has a purple color added, and the lower print has a tarnished look. Both of the prints on the right are on the ‘Gold’ paper, with the lower print darkened with a damask print overlay.

Photo of comparison Multipaper DMA prints from inside GraphiStudio Image Box owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Our second studio sample is a Studio Box (compare how the hinge differs from the Graphi Box above) in black ‘Touch Paper’ with names lazer-engraved in white and a red ribbon. It is the smallest Image Box available in both size and quantity, holding 10 6×8 prints. Like with the blue leather album earlier in this post, these prints are the lower-cost ‘White Paper’ option, and they are mounted on a white substrate instead of black. For the photos, we chose studio portraits of our three boys from our sister studio, Bump & Bambino. Following birth order, Caleb is the top row, Isaac in the middle and Levi at the bottom. Adorable, we know. 😉

Photo of black GraphiStudio Image Box owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of open GraphiStudio Image Box showing DMA print inside owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of White Paper DMA prints from inside GraphiStudio Image Box owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of detail of DMA print from inside GraphiStudio Image Box owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

GraphiStudio offers some terrific duplicate album options for parents. Additional copies that are identical in every way to the original Digital Matted Album get a 25% discount, but remain a high-priced item. A second, far cheaper option is a non-DMA album with press-printed pages and a printed hardback cover. Several sizes are available, from 8×12 to 2×2.5 inches. While they lack the unique paper options and varnish overlays of the true Digital Matted Album, they otherwise have the same photo and mat layout, and are in the $50-$200 range for most albums, depending on size.


Way back in 2008, when we decided to completely revamp our album offerings, we went to a major tradeshow for wedding and portrait photographers in Las Vegas, and checked out every album company there. Our goal was to make sure that no one would have better albums than us. Our final choice was PictoBooks, out of Maryland. All these years later and they continue to impress and amaze us!

PictoBooks offers a wide variety of different album lines, but nearly all of them share a few key features. They have rigid pages that open 180 degrees to form a flat surface with just a thin vertical crease to separate the left and right pages. A single large sheet of professional photographic paper, laminated for protection from fingerprints, is used for each two-page spread. Photos and photo layouts can span the center crease and stretch from edge to edge on all four sides. The popular 10×10 inch size opens up to a big 20×10 inch spread! We do all the page designs ourselves, with our clients selecting the photos, choosing between our two design styles, and then reviewing the layouts, with us implementing any changes they want before their book is published. PictoBooks albums are all sturdily constructed with high-quality materials and craftsmanship appropriate for a family heirloom album that must withstand many years of enjoyment.

The biggest difference between the different PictoBooks album series is in the cover options, which range from faux leather and suede materials on the low end (in the popular Bijou series) to embossed genuine leathers, metals, woods, and even gold and diamonds on the high end. There are also a few differences in size options and construction methods between the various album series, and some options cost more than others. We can provide a PDF of our product catalog with all the pricing info to our clients by request, and you can visit the albums page of the PictoBooks website to explore all the options for yourself.

For the remainder of this post, we’ll be showing off photos of real PictoBooks albums that we’ve created for clients or as studio samples, with info on the album type and details. We start with the fanciest of our studio samples: a 12×12 PictoBooks Modello album with an embossed genuine leather cover in black, embellished with a metal name plate.

Photo of 12x12 Pictobooks Modello album with embossed leather cover and metal name plate owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of metal name plate on 12x12 Pictobooks Modello album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

This Modello album features our custom-designed style of page design. Under this style, we design each two-page spread from scratch so that every one is unique. Photo sizes can range from small to very large, and we sometimes even create multilayered layouts with small photos on top of large background photos. Other layouts feature photos on a clean black background. Custom cropping is common. Custom-designed albums generally require 2 photos per page. With a 20-page minimum, a custom-designed PictoBooks album will require at least 40 photos. A more common quantity is 40-60 photos, and we sometimes design albums containing over 100 photos!

Here are some of my favorite spreads from this album, ranging from the bride’s final preparations, to the wedding ceremony, bride and groom portraits, and late-reception partying. (If you were wondering, this amazing venue is the Weyerhaeuser Estate in Tacoma.)

Photo of first layout spread of 12x12 Pictobooks Modello album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of second layout spread of 12x12 Pictobooks Modello album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of third layout spread of 12x12 Pictobooks Modello album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of fourth layout spread of 12x12 Pictobooks Modello album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of fifth layout spread of 12x12 Pictobooks Modello album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of sixth layout spread of 12x12 Pictobooks Modello album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of seventh layout spread of 12x12 Pictobooks Modello album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of eighth layout spread of 12x12 Pictobooks Modello album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

This next album is an 8×10 PictoBooks Signature album, with a genuine leather-wrapped cover in ‘Sienna Chocolate’ embellished with a full-size cameo — a smooth, scratch-resistant photo plate created using a patent pending coating process that is unique to PictoBooks albums.

Photo of 8x10 Pictobooks Signature album with full-cover cameo owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of open spread in 8x10 Pictobooks Signature album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of another page spread in 8x10 Pictobooks Signature album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

The remainder of this post features PictoBooks Bijou series albums, which are by far our most popular albums. The reason is simple: Bijou albums are several hundred dollars cheaper than all the other PictoBooks album series, and there’s very little sacrifice in quality that accompanies those savings. Not to mention that some people prefer the synthetic leather and suede materials in the Bijou line to genuine cow leather!

Our first example is Javila and Stevo’s 10×10 Bijou wedding album, featuring a faux leather cover in ‘Mocha’ with a centered monogram. This is considered a standard cover option for the Bijou series, and it looked sharp! The third photo down shows the inner lining material inside the front and back covers.

Photo of 10x10 Pictobooks Bijou album with faux leather cover and centered monogram created by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of centered monogram on 10x10 Pictobooks Bijou album with faux leather cover created by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of inner page liner of 10x10 Pictobooks Bijou album created by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Here are a few layouts from this album, which features our custom-designed style. For the third photo, you rotate the book 90 degrees to enjoy a magnificent 20×10 inch “centerfold” of the newlyweds.

Photo of open page layout in 10x10 Pictobooks Bijou album with faux leather cover and centered monogram created by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of another open page layout in 10x10 Pictobooks Bijou album with faux leather cover and centered monogram created by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of full-bleed vertical open page layout in 10x10 Pictobooks Bijou album with faux leather cover and centered monogram created by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Here’s the cover of Cynthia and Aaron’s 10×10 Bijou wedding album in ‘Claret’ faux leather, with a different centered monogram.

Photo of PictoBooks Bijou album with Claret faux leather cover and monogram owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of spine of PictoBooks Bijou album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Here’s Amy and BJ’s 8×10 Bijou wedding album. It has a faux leather cover in ‘Cinder’ with two features: cover branding with the bride and groom’s names and wedding date, and a custom-shaped cameo. We are able to design our cameos in any shape or size we want. I created this shape myself to echo the curve of the skyline around the tree. Simple squares and rectangles are also popular options. The cameo upgrade can only be added in place of a monogram to faux leather covers.

Photo of PictoBooks Bijou album with Cinder faux leather cover with text branding and a custom-shaped cameo owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Amy and BJ’s album also happens to be the first one in this post to showcase our simply-designed style of photo layouts. We’ve found that while most of our clients love how our custom-designed style provides a whole other artistic dimension for experiencing their photos, others find them to be “busy” and harder to appreciate each photo individually. In response, we developed our simply-designed style, in which we utilize a set of three basic page templates with white-bordered photos over a black background for every page. It’s a design style that emulates an older style of wedding album that was popular for decades before this new style of album came along.

You can see the three page templates on the two spreads below. First, there’s the large horizontal template, which takes advantage of that unbroken gutter to achieve a photo size larger than the pages themselves. Then you see the small horizontal pair and large vertical templates. Note that while the cost per photo is the same whether an album is custom-designed or simply-designed, the minimum cost of the simply-designed album is lower because it averages one photo per page, half that of the custom-designed style. Simply-designed albums need to be rectangular, which accommodates the photo layouts better than squares, so all simply-designed Bijou albums are 8×10 inches.

Photo of open simply-designed page spread in PictoBooks Bijou album showing the large horizontal template, owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of open simply-designed page spread in PictoBooks Bijou album showing the large vertical and two small horizontal templates, owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

This next Bijou album, of Melissa and Matthew’s wedding, is also in the simply-designed designed style, but with the standard centered monogram on a ‘Mink’ faux suede cover.

Photo of 8x10 Pictobooks Bijou album with faux suede cover and centered monogram created by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of centered monogram on 8x10 Pictobooks Bijou album with faux suede cover created by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of open simply-designed page spread in PictoBooks Bijou album showing the large vertical and two small horizontal templates, created by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of open simply-designed page spread in PictoBooks Bijou album showing the large horizontal template, created by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Kate and Adam’s 10×10 Bijou wedding album is wrapped in ‘Lagoon’ faux suede with a centered monogram.

Photo of 10x10 Pictobooks Bijou album with faux suede cover and centered monogram owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of centered monogram on 10x10 Pictobooks Bijou album with faux suede cover owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Carmel and Jimmy’s 10×10 Bijou wedding album in ‘Blue Moon’ faux suede has an upgraded full-cover monogram. Full-cover monograms are only available in faux suede, and do cost a little more than centered monograms.

Photo of 10x10 Pictobooks Bijou album with faux suede cover and full-cover monogram owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of full-cover monogram on 10x10 Pictobooks Bijou album with faux suede cover owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Here are the first five spreads in Carmel and Jimmy’s album. We start the album off with a breathtaking title page featuring one big 20×10 inch image of the newlyweds at dusk with the Seattle skyline behind. Then it’s two spreads of getting-ready candids. The first utilizes a background image — a detail shot of the door of Carmel’s getting-ready room with a painterly treatment that would be utterly useless except for this one perfect application. The second is a custom photo layout over black with some custom photo cropping. Spread four, of a flawlessly executed first look between the bride and groom, is another custom layout on black, and the fifth layout is a simple multilayered design with a 5×7 photo on top of a 20×10 photo.

Photo of first open page layout in 10x10 Pictobooks Bijou album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of second open page layout in 10x10 Pictobooks Bijou album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of third open page layout in 10x10 Pictobooks Bijou album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of fourth open page layout in 10x10 Pictobooks Bijou album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of fifth open page layout in 10x10 Pictobooks Bijou album owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Aside from the many different colors of faux leather and faux suede fabrics, the Bijou line has a few other great options. One is an unusual distressed metallic fabric that PictoBooks calls ‘Ice’. Here are a couple photos of Dawn and Jeremy’s 10×10 Bijou wedding album in the ‘Chrome’ Ice cover with a centered monogram.

Photo of 10x10 Pictobooks Bijou album with Ice fabric cover and centered monogram owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of centered monogram on 10x10 Pictobooks Bijou album with Ice fabric cover owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

And last but not least, here’s Julia and Miguel’s Bijou wedding album with a cover made of real metal. There are seven different metal options — this one is the ‘Metal Silver’ cover, and other metals include copper, gold, black and white. It has a ‘Charcoal’ leather spine and back. The centered monogram has a raised surface in black.

Photo of PictoBooks Bijou album with Metal Silver cover and Charcoal leather spine and back owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of PictoBooks Bijou album with Metal Silver cover showing monogram, owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

Photo of open page spread in PictoBooks Bijou album with Metal Silver cover and Charcoal leather spine and back owned by Wallflower Photography of Tacoma

We’ll end this presentation on PictoBooks albums by discussing the different options for parent albums. Albums for parents are usually duplicate copies of the original album designed for the bride and groom. Duplicate albums are available at significant discount because all the design work has already been completed.

  • The first option for parent albums is literally an exact copy of the original album. These are usually available at about half the cost of the original.
  • The second option is an exact copy of the original page designs, but with a different cover, and maybe even in a smaller size. In fact, it doesn’t even have to be the same album type — the newlyweds might have gotten a 12×12 Modello and their parents got 10×10 Bijou copies, for example. The pricing is about half the cost of the usual price of the album type selected.
  • The third option is what PictoBooks calls Companion Albums. These albums are either 8×8 (if the original was square) or 8×10 (if rectangular) with just five colors of faux leather to choose from, and a centered monogram. The pages are press printed onto a smooth paper surface, which is a different kind of printing than all other PictoBooks albums that have genuine photographic paper pages. The quality isn’t as good. On the other hand, the price is a lot lower!

We’ve intentionally left pricing out of this blog post to keep focused on the huge variety of options offered by PictoBooks albums, inside and out. If you’d like a look at our current product catalog, or a custom quote on a certain album type, just let us know and we’ll be happy to help!


We take our albums seriously here at Wallflower Photography. As a full-service wedding photography studio, we consider album creation to be the third of our three-part premium wedding photography service (which is photography, post-processing, and album creation).

To me, crafting the album is the obvious final step in our duty as wedding photographers. Our job as professionals isn’t to just hand over a disc of digital files and tell our clients to go figure out how to enjoy them. That would be like an accomplished chef selling the individual components and seasonings of a dish and forcing his customers to cook and plate their own meals. As professionals, it’s our duty to use our expertise and connections to finish what we started and leave our clients with something beautiful to hold and love all their lives.

In fact, crafting albums for our just-married clientele is one of the most satisfying aspects of our jobs. We don’t require our clients to buy an album, and some never do, but those weddings always feel just a little bit incomplete.

We’ve hand-picked two of the world’s best album companies to build wedding albums for our clients. We have a lengthy history with PictoBooks, a Maryland-based company, having trusted our albums to them since 2008. They don’t disappoint. We call our PictoBooks albums our “storytelling” albums because the kind of creative layouts they make possible are perfect for presenting our wedding photos creatively, like a picture story.

When GraphiStudio, a famous album company in Italy, developed their Digital Matted Albums based on some hot new printing technology, we felt that they would be the perfect alternate wedding album option for our clientele. They trade creative, multiphoto layouts for simple, beautiful presentations on unique papers.

We’ve published separate blog posts to show off lots of photos of both types of albums, and to try to explain what you’re looking at. Here are the links:

PictoBooks Albums: Our storytelling wedding books

GraphiStudio Digital Matted Albums: State-of-the-art art

But first, let’s be straight: These albums aren’t cheap. Some are downright pricey! But of all the things you can spend money on, what will you treasure more, and for as long, as your wedding album? That album will probably be your first family heirloom. It might be the first possession you’d grab if your house caught fire. Your album is priceless, and it’s an investment that you’ll never regret.

Throughout the album design process, we try to keep as much of the work on us as possible while keeping you in control of the whole process. We ask you to kick off the design process by giving us a list of the photos that you want to appear in the album. We work from your list, and sometimes add more photos, to complete all the page designs. Then we present them to you on a special webpage so you can review them at your convenience. If there’s anything you want us to change, just describe what you want and we’ll make it happen, and then we’ll show you the revised versions. We don’t order the album until we have your final sign-off.

If you have any questions about our albums, including pricing, or about Wallflower Photography in general, please don’t hesitate to call us at 253.274.1222 or email us at info@wallflowerphoto.com.


Welcome to the 2014 edition of Wallflower Photography’s Best Of The Year blog series!

Every year in early January, we run a series of three blog posts to show off the best of our wedding photojournalism, wedding portraiture, and engagement portraiture from the year that just ended.

This is Part 3, Engagement Portraiture, which includes all portrait sessions with couples in casual, non-wedding dress. Other than weddings, it’s the only type of photography we do at Wallflower Photography. The vast majority of our engagement portrait clients have already hired us to photograph their weddings, although sometimes we’re hired by local couples who are getting married out of state, which was the case with two couples featured below.

In putting together this list, I was surprised to discover that every one of my engagement shoots of 2014, except one, were shot at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma. I think you’ll see why it’s so popular — we can get photos on the beach, in the forest, and in several different manicured gardens, all in two hours or less.

Without further ado, please enjoy our favorite engagement portraits of 2014! We start with Marisa and Gabe on Owen Beach, and since they enjoy tossing around a football, we made sure to include it in some fun photos.

An engagement portrait, photographed at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

An engagement portrait, photographed at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

I backed into a pokey bush with beautiful fall color for this last shot of Marisa and Gabe.

An engagement portrait, photographed at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

Here’s Melissa and Jeremy at Owen Beach, where there’s a great view of Mt. Rainier if the skies are clear enough.

An engagement portrait, photographed at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

An engagement portrait, photographed at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

Mel looks so cute in this next photo in the forest, and then we had a little fun with her engagement ring in the moss.

An engagement portrait, photographed at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

An engagement portrait, photographed at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

Next up is Erica and Jeff, pictured first at the fuchsia garden, then on a curvy little bridge in the Japanese garden, and last in my favorite patch of Point Defiance forest. Wide-angle photos with relatively “small” couples like these last two photos are perfectly suited for large prints.

An engagement portrait, photographed at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

An engagement portrait, photographed at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

An engagement portrait, photographed at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

An engagement portrait, photographed at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

Here’s something different, with Sheena and Tim standing on the porch of the historic Point Defiance Lodge, where the park superintendent lived with his family a century ago.

An engagement portrait, photographed at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

An engagement portrait, photographed at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

A silhouette portrait of Sheena and Tim at Owen Beach.

An engagement portrait, photographed at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

Teirani and Russell by the driftwood, and then the weathered retaining wall, at Owen Beach.

An engagement portrait, photographed at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

An engagement portrait, photographed at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

On our way into the forest, we stopped at the Fort Nisqually complex in the park, where we created this next portrait at the wall.

An engagement portrait, photographed at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

Amanda and Kristofer took an unusual approach to their engagement portraits, by scheduling them on their wedding day! They didn’t need the full six hours of our starting wedding package, and didn’t want to see each other before the ceremony to be photographed in wedding dress, so that’s the solution we came up with. I think knowing it was their wedding day gave a little extra charge to their engagement portraits. I think this first one (or is it two?) is particularly fun.

An engagement portrait, photographed at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

An engagement portrait, photographed at Point Defiance Park in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

Then we headed into the Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium, where their wedding was taking place, for the last leg of our engagement portrait shoot. Aren’t these trumpet flowers amazing?

An engagement portrait, photographed at the Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

This next shot through the bamboo wouldn’t have been the same without a remotely fired flash that Kris is holding at arm’s length, aimed at their faces.

An engagement portrait, photographed at the Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium in Tacoma, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

This last engagement shoot is the only one not photographed at Point Defiance Park. Instead, I met Caitlyn and John in Seattle, and all these portraits were shot in and around Pike Place Market and Opera Alley. They got married in Scotland, and unfortunately I was unable to convince them to bring me along. Maybe next year.

An engagement portrait, photographed near Pike Place Market in Seattle, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

An engagement portrait, photographed near Pike Place Market in Seattle, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

An engagement portrait, photographed near Pike Place Market in Seattle, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

An engagement portrait, photographed near Pike Place Market in Seattle, selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Engagement Portraiture of 2014

See Part 1 of this blog series: Wallflower Photography’s Best Wedding Photojournalism of 2014
See Part 2 of this blog series: Wallflower Photography’s Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014


Welcome to the 2014 edition of Wallflower Photography’s Best Of The Year blog series!

Every year in early January, we run a series of three blog posts to show off the best of our wedding photojournalism, wedding portraiture, and engagement portraiture from the year that just ended.

This is Part 2, Wedding Portraiture, which includes all wedding photos that were posed, or set up by us in some way, even though some might not look like it. Photos are grouped into four categories: Bride and Groom, Wedding Party, The Girls and The Guys.

Each photo is introduced with a little write-up, which you might find entertaining and/or educational. Aside from those, you might notice a few common themes in our posed photos of brides and grooms, brides and brides, and grooms and grooms. First, let me assure you that we do recognize the potential greatness of wedding portraits that feature serious expressions, interesting but rather unnatural poses, and/or making eye contact with the camera. We request these things at most, if not all, of the weddings we photograph, and we often get good results with them. But what we like more are portraits that reveal couples who look truly happy and deeply in love, and aren’t just putting on a face for the camera. You’ll see lots of genuine smiles, cuddling and occasionally kissing in our portraits, and in fact these moments are often candid within a posed setting, no doubt!

Without further ado, please enjoy our favorite posed wedding photos of 2014.

BRIDE AND GROOM

We start off with portraits from Thornewood Castle in Lakewood, a truly spectacular wedding venue where we got to photograph NINE weddings in 2014. It was incredibly difficult to limit ourselves to just five portraits for this category. Here’s what we picked, starting with two photos from Julia and Greg’s wedding in early May, one in the front yard and the second in the bay windows of the Presidential Suite.

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Skip forward a few months for this portrait of Austen and Will in the Thornewood Castle sunken garden.

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Elizabeth and Steven in the sunken garden.

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Amanda and Brandon in their rented Bentley, with the start of sunset reflected in the windows.

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Next, we switch to another fabulous wedding venue, Chambers Bay Golf Course in University Place. You know it must be an amazing place to have been selected to host the U.S. Open golf tournament this year! But at the same time, it’s the least “golf course-y” golf course for weddings that we’ve seen. These first three portraits are of Brittany and Zak down at the beach at sunset in a whirlwind mini shoot so we could get them back to their party.

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Silhouette portraits are one of our specialties, and Chambers Bay is a terrific place for them. If the one of Brittany and Zak above wasn’t proof enough, the two of Nikki and Aric below — at totally different times of the day — should do it.

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

We saw both sun and rain during our three 2014 weddings at Rock Creek Gardens in Puyallup. First up is Anna and Eddie, who also saw both sun and rain on their wedding.

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Then we have two humorous portraits of Courtney and Matt, the first one featuring her dad with a shotgun, then their son reacting to the activity occurring over his head.

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

And last from RCG, a fun portrait of Sierra and Travis framed in a garden arch. The rain never wiped those smiles from their faces.

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

We were disappointed to not be able to include even more than these three portraits from Heather and Josh’s wedding at Laurel Creek Manor in Sumner.

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Nico and Andrew are posed on one of the little bridges spanning a creek at the Hollywood Schoolhouse in Woodinville, with color provided by a huge flowering cherry tree in the background.

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Then Nico and Andrew are framed by the arms of a statue of dancing girls in a Hollywood Schoolhouse courtyard.

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

After their wedding ceremony and reception, Varee and Erich hired me to stay with them for a couple more hours so we could go on a ‘portrait tour’ of several photogenic places around Seattle. Our first stop might have been the best: the Woodland Park Rose Garden, where I shot these two candid-esque portraits.

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Between Lauren and Tim’s Olympia-area wedding ceremony and reception, we stopped by the state capitol campus for portraits on and around the Legislative Building, including this next photo.

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

A portrait of Gabi and Brandon gazing at each other outside the famous Edgewater Hotel in Seattle. I nestled into a Japanese maple to get those red leaves to frame them.

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Cherry gives John a nuzzle during their wedding at her parents’ park-like property near Olympia.

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Katie and Scot in front of the historic Belle Chapel in Snohomish.

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Holli and John on a bench in the Asian Rainforest section of the Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium in Tacoma. This is a pose we’ve used many times before, though it’s usually the bride with her feet kicked up on the bench. A little miscommunication led to a role reversal that led to one of our favorite portraits of the year!

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Here’s something unusual: a funky, semi-translucent frame for this portrait of Maile and Toka in front of the iconic Hotshop Cone at the Museum of Glass in Tacoma. This would look so cool printed on aluminum …

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Cynthia and Anthony sharing a laugh while sitting in the center of Water Forest at the Museum of Glass. Water fills each of the cylinders and flows out the top just fast enough to coat the sides.

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Cynthia and Anthony at the Museum of Glass again, this time at dusk, with the illuminated glass of Fluent Steps providing some lovely shape and color.

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

And we end with two night portraits of Constance and Daniel, whose wedding at LeMay – America’s Car Museum in Tacoma was our first at this unique wedding venue. My two biggest takeaways: One, the architecture and huge window wall with the view of downtown Tacoma are so cool, you hardly notice the rows of gleaming antique cars (except when you want to notice them). You don’t have to be a car lover to love this space. And two, it’s a very challenging venue for actually photographing a wedding, whether day and night, and I was very thankful to have brought my full set of lights to the party!

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

A posed bride and groom wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

WEDDING PARTY

With so many great wedding party portraits to pull from, we forced ourselves to pick fewer than ten out of the 32 weddings we photographed in 2014, and favored photos that have energy, creative groupings/poses/formations of wedding party members, terrific settings, and/or interesting camera angles.

First up is Maile and Toka’s wedding party, posed in front of the Albers Mill apartment building next to the Museum of Glass. It was a hot summer day and shade was practically a requirement, both for light quality and basic human comfort, and we found plenty of it in this unique glass and metal setting. I’m glad we let the guys keep holding their cigars for this photo; in fact, I often wish groomsmen had a prop to hold, just as the bridesmaids have their bouquets.

A posed wedding party photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Still at the Museum of Glass on a similarly hot and sunny day, it’s Cynthia and Anthony’s wedding party in the sliver of shade cast by the elevator’s unique roof on the top level of the building.

A posed wedding party photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Brittany and Zak had the coolest sky for their wedding at Chambers Bay Golf Course, which helped us win an award for one of their ceremony photos. Here, we pulled our bride and groom forward to quickly and easily break up the more formal all-in-line portrait that we started with.

A posed wedding party photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Then we opened it up for their fun-loving bridesmaids and groomsmen to strike a pose.

A posed wedding party photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

We did something similar for this portrait of Chanel and Andy’s wedding party at Thornewood Castle. We started with the signs and sign-holders all in a nice, tidy line, then asked them to shake it up a bit. Of course, it’s the groomsmen in mid-air who really steals the thunder.

A posed wedding party photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Sarah and Andrew with their wedding party in an informal asymmetrical scatter pose on the decommissioned railroad tracks near their wedding venue, The Canal in Ballard. (Please never pose on train tracks that are still in use!)

A posed wedding party photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

A symmetrical coupled scatter pose for Lauren and Tim’s wedding party on the Legislative Building steps in Olympia.

A posed wedding party photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

And … I don’t really know what to call this particular pose, with Adele and Dave and their kids in the shade at the back of Thornewood Castle. But I like it!

A posed wedding party photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

THE GIRLS

Beautiful window light for a beautiful bride. Laura shot this portrait of Brittany in her hotel room at the Hampton Inn in DuPont.

A posed wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

This portrait of Nico almost qualified for two categories in our Best of 2014 blog series: this one in the Wedding Portraiture post, and the Detail category in the Wedding Photojournalism post.

A posed wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Cynthia’s beauty, her jewelry bouquet and spiky tiara, and the cool tones I chose for this image make me think of a certain crazy-popular new Disney movie princess. That diamond pattern behind her is the Hotshop Cone at the Museum of Glass.

A posed wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Freida and Sabra, two Southern girls enduring the spring chill and their feet slowly sinking into the wet sand for this fisheye portrait from Owen Beach in Tacoma’s Point Defiance Park.

A posed wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

I know, the bride and bridesmaid pose where everyone is told to look at each other is cliche and cheesy-sounding, but you know what? We get great results almost every time. Some good advice for the ladies: I understand if it feels a bit uncomfortable, but don’t overact the part with exaggerated expressions, talking and fast movements. Just hold relatively still, look toward the middle, smile and laugh without going overboard. (Fake laughter is okay, I’m not shooting a video.)

I included three of these portraits, with the first being of Adele and her bridsmaids in the Grandview Suite of Thornewood Castle, just after getting ready for the ceremony.

A posed wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Next, it’s Julia and her bridesmaids at the back of Thornewood Castle.

A posed wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

And here’s Cynthia and her bridesmaids in the shade of Albers Mill next to the Museum of Glass.

A posed wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

I can’t really explain what it is, but there’s just something about this photo — an outtake shot before we had finished setting up the pose — that I really like. That’s the view at Chambers Bay Golf Course, if you didn’t recognize it from earlier photos of Brittany and Zak’s wedding.

A posed wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Sierra and her bridesmaids in what we call a ‘receding line’ formation, in a little courtyard at Rock Creek Gardens in Puyallup during a quick break in the rain.

A posed wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Amanda and Kristofer’s flower girl brought her shark costume specifically for this shot inside the shark jaws at the Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium.

A posed wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

THE GUYS

I shot three same-sex weddings in 2014, one with double brides and two of the groom-groom variety. I got super-lucky by getting four great guys with interesting, photogenic weddings.

Here are two portraits of Cedric and Kevin in a corner of the sunken garden at Thornewood Castle.

A posed wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

A posed wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

And another of Cedric and Kevin in their car out by the front door. There’s a radio-controlled flash unit in the car with them, providing most of the light on their faces.

A posed wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Arthur and Joe are featured in the next three portraits, all shot in the immediate vicinity of their wedding reception venue, The Bistro at Russell Landing on Joint Base Lewis McChord. I’ve always enjoyed photographing grooms in uniform, and it’s quite the sight to double down!

A posed wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

A posed wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

A posed wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Here’s that ‘receding line’ pose that I showed off with Sierra and her bridesmaids above, and now it’s of her husband Travis and his groomsmen, but this time in the opposite direction, with serious expressions and in black and white.

A posed wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Another serious groomsmen portrait in black and white, this time of Tim and his groomsmen near their wedding venue, The Heritage Room on Capitol Lake.

A posed wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

Photographing guys in uniform is particularly fun when they bring swords, as Zak and his groomsmen did. Best yet, I hardly had to adjust the poses they came up with on their own. (Though if I had a re-do, I’d swap the two guys in the distant right to better reveal the sword-golfer. Perfection is so difficult to achieve.)

A posed wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

We ended the Girls section with a mini cutie, and now here’s the boy version, featuring Courtney and Matt’s favorite little guy. I just started calling out a series of specific facial expressions, and he was more than happy to comply.

A posed wedding photo selected for Wallflower Photography's Best Wedding Portraiture of 2014

(Click to enlarge.)

See Part 1 of this blog series: Wallflower Photography’s Best Wedding Photojournalism of 2014
See Part 3 of this blog series: Wallflower Photography’s Best Engagement Portraits of 2014

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